Stormy Daniels Releases Damning Photos And Texts

JUST IN: The White House is undoubtedly in full panic mode right now after adult film star Stormy Daniels offered to pay back the $130,000 she was allegedly paid for her silence so that she can talk openly about President Donald Trump.

NBC News reported that Daniels, also known as Stephanie Clifford, made the offer in a letter sent on Monday to Trump’s private attorney Michael Cohen, who drew up a nondisclosure agreement with her shortly before the 2016 presidential election. Daniels’ letter was also sent to Lawrence Rosen, an attorney who has identified himself as representing Cohen, and to EC LLC, a company Cohen formed in connection to the agreement and the payment made to Daniels in October 2016.

The letter states that Daniels can send the money to Trump by Friday, and that in return, she will be allowed to “speak openly and freely about her prior relationship with the president and the attempts to silence her and use and publish and text messages, photos and videos relating to the president that she may have in her possession, all without fear of retribution or legal liability.”

“This has never been about the money,” said Daniels’ lawyer, Michael Avenatti. “It has always been about Ms. Clifford being allowed to tell the truth. The American people should be permitted to judge for themselves who is shooting straight with them and who is misleading them. Our offer seeks to allow this to happen.”

This comes a week after Daniels filed a lawsuit claiming that she had an affair with Trump between 2006 and 2007 and struck a deal a decade later to keep quiet about it. However, she now claims that the agreement is null and void because Trump never actually signed it.

The White House has denied that the affair ever took place, and Cohen has gotten a temporary restraining order barring Daniels from discussing “confidential information” related to the agreement.

“I believe Mr. Avenatti’s actions and behavior has been both reckless and imprudent as it opens Ms. Clifford to substantial monetary liability, which I intend to pursue,” Cohen said last week.

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